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Messages - RealityHasALiberalBias

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1
https://www.thenation.com/article/steve-king-republican-abortion/

What we’re seeing here is part of the GOP effort, aided by the media, to define racism or sexism or homophobia as something extreme and unhinged, as opposed to something common and integrated into our society. Republicans (along with many Democrats, frankly) don’t want to deal with the structural impact of white supremacy as practiced in this country for 400 years. They just want to label white supremacists as “fringe” figures who are “not actually a real problem,” as Tucker Carlson said. They don’t want to deal with the moral implications of forcing a woman to have her body hijacked for nine months, against her will, because she’s been the victim of a violent crime. They just want to throw up draconian abortion bans and institute fetal-personhood amendments but pretend like Kevin Williamson is a little wacky.

Republican politicians will be the first ones to decry political correctness when one of their racist flock gets zapped on Twitter for promoting hate speech, but the only kind of bigotry and misogyny they’re willing to acknowledge is the kind based on words, instead of actions. You can get Republican pols to furrow their brows and say, “I wish the president wouldn’t tweet so much.” But you can’t get them to do anything about the president’s policies of dehumanizing immigrants, terrorizing black and brown communities, suppressing the votes of nonwhite citizens, or erecting a wall to stand as a monument to his bigotry. No, they’d much rather go after King for saying something stupid about white nationalism than vote against the policies of white nationalism. They’d much rather go after King for saying something stupid about rape than go after Brett Kavanaugh for allegedly trying to rape somebody.

Asking Steve King to resign, but not Donald Trump, is a Republican strategy for normalizing Donald Trump. Trump is the bride to white nationalism; King is just the bridesmaid being asked to wear the ugly dress.

Republicans don’t have a problem with what Steve King believes; they have a problem with how he says it. Again, the Examiner makes that point plain: “Steve King’s rhetorical stupidity hurts the pro-life movement.”


2
https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/08/07/the-new-politics-of-the-white-supremacist-evangelical-republican-party/

Despite Trump’s horrendous racist, xenophobic, and misogynist language and a personal lifestyle that lives this rhetoric, Republicans and white evangelicals are with him. Recent Pew Research Center polls puts Trump’s approval among evangelicals at 69%, down from a high of 78% but still overwhelming. His strongest support according to a Marist survey is among white evangelicals with 73% approval. Similarly, among Republicans, Trump’s support is nearly 90% and after his most recent racist tweets, his approval went up. Self-avowed Neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin supports Trump, and presumably were surveys among white supremacists conducted, one would find similarly high poll numbers for Trump. Trump’s base is these three groups, but in many ways they have merged.

The Republican Party today of Donald Trump is the product of three political movements that have consolidated to a core set of principles that focus mostly on race, but also on guns, abortion, and gay rights.

Consider first the traditional Republican Party. While some may argue that the GOP is about low taxes and limited government, both are only ancillary to a more fundamental issue—race. Ever since Nixon ran as the law and order candidate and initiated the war on drugs, the mantle of so much Republican rhetoric has been about race. Attacks on the welfare state, crime, and support for school choice and states’ rights have always been code words for race. Nixon’s famous “Southern strategy” in 1968 was using covert racial codewords to pry away whites from the Democratic Party to vote for him. Reagan continued that strategy, appealing to the economic anxiety and racial fears of white working class. The recently uncovered 1971 Nixon-Reagan phone call reveals the racial dimension of both of their politics. The Republican Party has become the party of white America; the only difference between what Nixon and Reagan did and what Trump is doing in the 2020 election cycle is that he has abandoned the pretense of covert racism and rhetoric for overt.

Second, think back to the 1970s with Jerry Falwell and the formation of the Moral Majority, or to Anita Bryant’s crusades. Yes, these individuals, their organizations, as well as other such as Oral Roberts, Tammy and Jim Baker, and Pat Robertson and the 700 Club all formed in reaction to Roe v. Wade and abortion. But they were also organizations opposed to gay rights and grew in the face of a perception that Christianity was under attack and that God was being pushed out of schools. These Christian organizations perceived a rising moral decadence in America, symbolized by rising divorce rates, the birth of non-marital children, sex education in schools, the Equal Rights Amendment, and a host of other policies and trends that portended Armageddon was near. Fear of the ungodly is what drove the evangelicals, much as it was fear that moved the original Puritans and Pilgrims according to historian Perry Miller.

But the fear for the Moral Majority and the new Christian movement had included a racial component. The changes coming to America they most feared was the movement away of America from a White Christian nation. Abortion, abortionists, gays, lesbians, transgenders, all were opposed, but these terms too served as codewords for “the others,” including race. Look at the composition of the Moral Majority, the attendees at Anti Bryant Rallies, the viewership for the 700 Club—all White. A composition not much different from the attendees at Joel Osteen’s televised church services, or Jerry Fawell, Jr.’s Liberty University. Christianity and the Constitution are white, and a coming world of Muslims and immigrants is something to fear.

Finally there are the white supremacists. Xenophobic and racist groups have always existed in America as historian Richard Hofstadter revealed. the Klan and the John Birch Society are the most famous. But many of the militias that formed over time did so over the issue of race. Guns and the Second Amendment were also critical to their organizations; both served as guardians against a repressive national government, preserve individual rights, and defend against racial violence. At varying times in history these groups were more mainstream than others, but largely they were marginalized from the 1970s to perhaps 1990s. Occasionally they would surface, the 1977 American Nazi Party march in Skokie, Illinois, or David Duke’s 1991 gubernatorial candidacy in Louisiana, but mainstream Republicans denounced them, and they were ignored or shunned in the mainstream media.

3
https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/08/07/the-new-politics-of-the-white-supremacist-evangelical-republican-party/

Despite Trump’s horrendous racist, xenophobic, and misogynist language and a personal lifestyle that lives this rhetoric, Republicans and white evangelicals are with him. Recent Pew Research Center polls puts Trump’s approval among evangelicals at 69%, down from a high of 78% but still overwhelming. His strongest support according to a Marist survey is among white evangelicals with 73% approval. Similarly, among Republicans, Trump’s support is nearly 90% and after his most recent racist tweets, his approval went up. Self-avowed Neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin supports Trump, and presumably were surveys among white supremacists conducted, one would find similarly high poll numbers for Trump. Trump’s base is these three groups, but in many ways they have merged.

The Republican Party today of Donald Trump is the product of three political movements that have consolidated to a core set of principles that focus mostly on race, but also on guns, abortion, and gay rights.

Consider first the traditional Republican Party. While some may argue that the GOP is about low taxes and limited government, both are only ancillary to a more fundamental issue—race. Ever since Nixon ran as the law and order candidate and initiated the war on drugs, the mantle of so much Republican rhetoric has been about race. Attacks on the welfare state, crime, and support for school choice and states’ rights have always been code words for race. Nixon’s famous “Southern strategy” in 1968 was using covert racial codewords to pry away whites from the Democratic Party to vote for him. Reagan continued that strategy, appealing to the economic anxiety and racial fears of white working class. The recently uncovered 1971 Nixon-Reagan phone call reveals the racial dimension of both of their politics. The Republican Party has become the party of white America; the only difference between what Nixon and Reagan did and what Trump is doing in the 2020 election cycle is that he has abandoned the pretense of covert racism and rhetoric for overt.

Second, think back to the 1970s with Jerry Falwell and the formation of the Moral Majority, or to Anita Bryant’s crusades. Yes, these individuals, their organizations, as well as other such as Oral Roberts, Tammy and Jim Baker, and Pat Robertson and the 700 Club all formed in reaction to Roe v. Wade and abortion. But they were also organizations opposed to gay rights and grew in the face of a perception that Christianity was under attack and that God was being pushed out of schools. These Christian organizations perceived a rising moral decadence in America, symbolized by rising divorce rates, the birth of non-marital children, sex education in schools, the Equal Rights Amendment, and a host of other policies and trends that portended Armageddon was near. Fear of the ungodly is what drove the evangelicals, much as it was fear that moved the original Puritans and Pilgrims according to historian Perry Miller.

But the fear for the Moral Majority and the new Christian movement had included a racial component. The changes coming to America they most feared was the movement away of America from a White Christian nation. Abortion, abortionists, gays, lesbians, transgenders, all were opposed, but these terms too served as codewords for “the others,” including race. Look at the composition of the Moral Majority, the attendees at Anti Bryant Rallies, the viewership for the 700 Club—all White. A composition not much different from the attendees at Joel Osteen’s televised church services, or Jerry Fawell, Jr.’s Liberty University. Christianity and the Constitution are white, and a coming world of Muslims and immigrants is something to fear.

Finally there are the white supremacists. Xenophobic and racist groups have always existed in America as historian Richard Hofstadter revealed. the Klan and the John Birch Society are the most famous. But many of the militias that formed over time did so over the issue of race. Guns and the Second Amendment were also critical to their organizations; both served as guardians against a repressive national government, preserve individual rights, and defend against racial violence. At varying times in history these groups were more mainstream than others, but largely they were marginalized from the 1970s to perhaps 1990s. Occasionally they would surface, the 1977 American Nazi Party march in Skokie, Illinois, or David Duke’s 1991 gubernatorial candidacy in Louisiana, but mainstream Republicans denounced them, and they were ignored or shunned in the mainstream media.

4
https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/08/07/the-new-politics-of-the-white-supremacist-evangelical-republican-party/

Despite Trump’s horrendous racist, xenophobic, and misogynist language and a personal lifestyle that lives this rhetoric, Republicans and white evangelicals are with him. Recent Pew Research Center polls puts Trump’s approval among evangelicals at 69%, down from a high of 78% but still overwhelming. His strongest support according to a Marist survey is among white evangelicals with 73% approval. Similarly, among Republicans, Trump’s support is nearly 90% and after his most recent racist tweets, his approval went up. Self-avowed Neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin supports Trump, and presumably were surveys among white supremacists conducted, one would find similarly high poll numbers for Trump. Trump’s base is these three groups, but in many ways they have merged.

The Republican Party today of Donald Trump is the product of three political movements that have consolidated to a core set of principles that focus mostly on race, but also on guns, abortion, and gay rights.

Consider first the traditional Republican Party. While some may argue that the GOP is about low taxes and limited government, both are only ancillary to a more fundamental issue—race. Ever since Nixon ran as the law and order candidate and initiated the war on drugs, the mantle of so much Republican rhetoric has been about race. Attacks on the welfare state, crime, and support for school choice and states’ rights have always been code words for race. Nixon’s famous “Southern strategy” in 1968 was using covert racial codewords to pry away whites from the Democratic Party to vote for him. Reagan continued that strategy, appealing to the economic anxiety and racial fears of white working class. The recently uncovered 1971 Nixon-Reagan phone call reveals the racial dimension of both of their politics. The Republican Party has become the party of white America; the only difference between what Nixon and Reagan did and what Trump is doing in the 2020 election cycle is that he has abandoned the pretense of covert racism and rhetoric for overt.

Second, think back to the 1970s with Jerry Falwell and the formation of the Moral Majority, or to Anita Bryant’s crusades. Yes, these individuals, their organizations, as well as other such as Oral Roberts, Tammy and Jim Baker, and Pat Robertson and the 700 Club all formed in reaction to Roe v. Wade and abortion. But they were also organizations opposed to gay rights and grew in the face of a perception that Christianity was under attack and that God was being pushed out of schools. These Christian organizations perceived a rising moral decadence in America, symbolized by rising divorce rates, the birth of non-marital children, sex education in schools, the Equal Rights Amendment, and a host of other policies and trends that portended Armageddon was near. Fear of the ungodly is what drove the evangelicals, much as it was fear that moved the original Puritans and Pilgrims according to historian Perry Miller.

But the fear for the Moral Majority and the new Christian movement had included a racial component. The changes coming to America they most feared was the movement away of America from a White Christian nation. Abortion, abortionists, gays, lesbians, transgenders, all were opposed, but these terms too served as codewords for “the others,” including race. Look at the composition of the Moral Majority, the attendees at Anti Bryant Rallies, the viewership for the 700 Club—all White. A composition not much different from the attendees at Joel Osteen’s televised church services, or Jerry Fawell, Jr.’s Liberty University. Christianity and the Constitution are white, and a coming world of Muslims and immigrants is something to fear.

Finally there are the white supremacists. Xenophobic and racist groups have always existed in America as historian Richard Hofstadter revealed. the Klan and the John Birch Society are the most famous. But many of the militias that formed over time did so over the issue of race. Guns and the Second Amendment were also critical to their organizations; both served as guardians against a repressive national government, preserve individual rights, and defend against racial violence. At varying times in history these groups were more mainstream than others, but largely they were marginalized from the 1970s to perhaps 1990s. Occasionally they would surface, the 1977 American Nazi Party march in Skokie, Illinois, or David Duke’s 1991 gubernatorial candidacy in Louisiana, but mainstream Republicans denounced them, and they were ignored or shunned in the mainstream media.

5
Orange Hitler has not idea what to say.

6
Politics / Re: #moscowmitch
« on: August 14, 2019, 11:09:58 AM »
They don't care about our nation. They are a minority intent upon imposing their will on the majority. They don't believe in democracy. They don't have any use for the principles upon which our nation was founded other than the obsolete ones that involved white supremacy. They are stupid, cruel, and miserable people.

They are fascists.

7
why is it the president's responsibility to support democracy  ???  is that a real question  ???

I don't have to look at its post to know it is trolling you. It is obnoxious, isn't it?

It has no use for democracy. It knows it is a minority and it derives some bizarre vicarious thrill from having a moron in charge. The moron doesn't support democracy either. And neither Caroline nor the moron could give a rat's ass that the Chinese government is still communist, owns 70% of all Chinese businesses, and is a dictatorship. It was lying to you when it said it opposed these things, just as it lies when it calls itself "Christian." It has no values. It has no principles. It is obnoxious.

Being obnoxious is the only thing it does well. and you provide an outlet for it.

8
In The News / Re: Epstein "suicide"
« on: August 13, 2019, 11:12:50 AM »
dumbass. the DA does not control where the prisoner is kept, and nothing in your article says he made that decision.

Caroline is lying again? Carolyn is bearing false witness again? Gee, what a surprise.

She is a Christian, isn't she? Bearing false witness?

9
Politics / Republicans Get A Clue
« on: August 13, 2019, 10:20:13 AM »

10
Politics / Re: Congratulations Trump on reaching 12,000!
« on: August 13, 2019, 10:18:07 AM »
#1 "conservative value:" lying.

Why do you host these liars here? What's the point?

12
In The News / Re: Epstein "suicide"
« on: August 12, 2019, 04:03:23 PM »
Why did Bill Barr have Epstein moved from Rikers to the Metropolitan Correctional Center  ???

Barr lied about the Mueller report. Before that Barr covered up George H. W. Bush's criminal actions in Iran Contra.

Barr is a liar. Barr is corrupt. Barr is covering up for the Orange Hitler, who is the most corrupt and incompetent president we have ever had. Barr needs to be impeached but of course Mitch McConnell would never convict Barr, because he too is corrupt.

VOTE DEMOCRATIC as if your life depends on it, because it does.

13
In The News / Re: Epstein "suicide"
« on: August 12, 2019, 12:56:38 PM »
Looks like we found something the right and left can agree on.

.. the issue is something or someone in the DOJ failed here and is currently run by the Trump administration.    He was off suicide watch, and was housed with another inmate: wtf  ???

Left: Isn't it curious how Orange Hitler's former buddy, who dumped him after Orange Hitler ripped him off in a real estate deal involving Russians, dies in the custody of Orange Hitler's Department of Justice headed by Orange Hitler's shill who himself has ties up and down to Epstein with a Department of Correction managed by an acting director....

Right: A 73 year old grandma who couldn't manage to defeat the most corrupt, incompetent grifter, whose husband (who apparently didn't know Epstein well) was loaned a jet for Clinton Foundation use, managed to get into that Department of Corrections and have Epstein murdered.

Yep, same thing.

These people are sick. All of them. 35% to 40% of our population is sick.

VOTE DEMOCRATIC!

14
In The News / Re: Man attacks boy, his lawyer blames Trump
« on: August 09, 2019, 06:13:56 PM »
You mean since Trump's personal lawyer was sentenced to jail for crimes Donald Trump (aka Individual 1) ordered him to do?

Tucker Carlson never told the bitch to believe that.

15
In The News / Re: Man attacks boy, his lawyer blames Trump
« on: August 09, 2019, 11:22:38 AM »
and what do you know he's a Trump supporter, and Trump's rhetoric drove him to violence, per your article

He said Brockway was influenced by President Donald Trump’s “rhetoric” surrounding the national anthem.   “His commander in chief is telling people that if they kneel, they should be fired, or if they burn a flag, they should be punished,” Jasper told the newspaper. “He certainly didn’t understand it was a crime.”

WE, THE  PEOPLE are being terrorized by Orange Hitler and his malignant cult followers like the evil bitch Caroline whom you're talking to here.

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