Author Topic: Florida's Schrödinger's virus  (Read 267 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online notoc

  • Hero NewsRaker
  • *****
  • Posts: 12665
  • Liked: 594
  • Karma: +97/-84
    • View Profile
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 01:27:27 PM by notoc »

Online RealityHasALiberalBias

  • Hero NewsRaker
  • *****
  • Posts: 10030
  • Liked: 970
  • Karma: +72/-68
  • NewsRaker
    • View Profile
Re: Florida's Schrödinger's virus
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2020, 01:48:03 PM »
The number of confirmed cases is expected to continue climbing as more people get tested. The state says that 10 percent of its tests for the novel coronavirus have come back positive.

DeSantos, Republican hack, just now declares a stay in place order. He did so not because he wants to save lives. He did so moments before a court would have ordered him to do his job.

Power is more important than lives but they will never own that or admit it.

Lying: the one and only "conservative" value.

Online notoc

  • Hero NewsRaker
  • *****
  • Posts: 12665
  • Liked: 594
  • Karma: +97/-84
    • View Profile
Re: Florida's Schrödinger's virus
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2020, 02:00:09 PM »
It's becoming increasingly obvious that Larry Vaughn's DeSantos' refusal to close the beach cancel spring break has successfully seeded every state. If his intention is to infect the entire country then he really could not be doing a better job that he already is.

Online notoc

  • Hero NewsRaker
  • *****
  • Posts: 12665
  • Liked: 594
  • Karma: +97/-84
    • View Profile
Re: Florida's Schrödinger's virus
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2020, 02:10:26 PM »
Quote
As the coronavirus marches from America’s coastal cities to its heartland, testing gaps in the South and Midwest are crippling efforts to contain emerging hotspots in smaller cities and rural areas.

Georgia, Michigan and Oklahoma are among the states where coronavirus outbreaks are intensifying — and where per capita testing rates are some of the lowest in the nation. While hard-hit New York state was testing more than 950 out of every 100,000 people as of Monday, Georgia was only testing 127 and Oklahoma 43. That raises the likelihood that these states are severely underestimating the size of their outbreaks.

The testing blindspots not only make it harder to slow the spread of disease, health officials say, but also to know when it’s safe to ease social distancing measures.

Former acting CMS chief Andy Slavitt worries that undercounting coronavirus cases is lulling some states into a false sense of security that is enabling the virus to spread farther and faster.

“There’s a perfect storm I worry about in certain states where their commonality is that they have low testing and low social distancing guidelines,” Slavitt told POLITICO. Oklahoma, for instance, has put in place limited “stay at home” guidelines that apply to the elderly and those with underlying medical conditions, rather than the general public.

Individual states’ testing struggles also mask the true size of the national coronavirus outbreak, says Mike Carome, director of the health research group at the advocacy organization Public Citizen. “The failure to do testing in some states is giving us an under representation of the scope of the pandemic,” he said.

Texas, which has a per capita testing rate of just 124 people out of every 100,000, ran out of coronavirus tests Tuesday at one state health lab. Any further testing of people in that part of Texas must be done elsewhere unless the public lab gets more testing materials, said Tom Banning, CEO at the Texas Academy of Family Physicians.


https://www.politico.com/news/2020/03/31/testing-coronavirus-blindspots-157993

Offline Mayhem

  • Hero NewsRaker
  • *****
  • Posts: 515
  • Liked: 34
  • Karma: +22/-23
  • NewsRaker
    • View Profile
Re: Florida's Schrödinger's virus
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2020, 05:59:13 PM »
The state says that 10 percent of its tests for the novel coronavirus have come back positive.[/url]

That's a misleading figure, 10%.  It implies that 10% of the public in general is likely to be infected. What it really says is that 10% of a smaller group, those "with reason to be tested, i.e. possible symptoms, tested positive.

Online notoc

  • Hero NewsRaker
  • *****
  • Posts: 12665
  • Liked: 594
  • Karma: +97/-84
    • View Profile
Re: Florida's Schrödinger's virus
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2020, 07:05:05 PM »
That's a misleading figure, 10%.  It implies that 10% of the public in general is likely to be infected. What it really says is that 10% of a smaller group, those "with reason to be tested, i.e. possible symptoms, tested positive.
I'm not sure anyone knows what the state's figure of '10% of tested' actually means. Which was kind of my point...no one knows if the cat is dead or alive until they look in the box, but first they need to find the right box.