Author Topic: Making America great again  (Read 23971 times)

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Offline Mornac

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Re: Making America great again
« Reply #480 on: January 23, 2020, 10:18:46 AM »
Trump declares Roe v. Wade anniversary as National Sanctity of Human Life Day

Dave Boyer
January 21, 2020

President Trump proclaimed the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade ruling on abortion as National Sanctity of Human Life Day, saying there is “more to be done” to reduce abortions.

Mr. Trump, in a proclamation timed for the 47th anniversary of the Roe decision on Wednesday, said the nation “proudly and strongly reaffirms our commitment to protect the precious gift of life at every stage, from conception to natural death.”

“Every person —— the born and unborn, the poor, the downcast, the disabled, the infirm, and the elderly — has inherent value,” the president said. “Although each journey is different, no life is without worth or is inconsequential; the rights of all people must be defended.”

On Jan. 22, 1973, the high court effectively legalized abortion across the country by striking down a Texas law that banned it.

“I call on the American people to continue to care for women in unexpected pregnancies and to support adoption and foster care in a more meaningful way, so every child can have a loving home,” the president said. “And finally, I ask every citizen of this great nation to listen to the sound of silence caused by a generation lost to us, and then to raise their voices for all affected by abortion, both seen and unseen.”

The president’s proclamation pointed out that the number and rate of abortions have decreased by 24% and 26%, respectively, from 2007 to 2016, the most recent period for which figures are available. It said the rate of teen pregnancies also has generally declined.

He noted that he signed a law that allows states and other grantees to exclude organizations that perform abortions from Title X funding. The administration also issued regulations to ensure Title X family planning projects are “clearly separated from those that perform, promote or refer for abortion as a method of family planning; to protect the conscience rights of healthcare workers and organizations, including with respect to abortion; and to ensure the federal government does not force employers that object, based on religious belief or moral conviction, to provide insurance for contraceptives, including those they believe cause early abortions.”

He also has urged Congress to prohibit abortions of later-term babies.

“My administration is also building an international coalition to dispel the concept of abortion as a fundamental human right,” he said. “So far, 24 nations representing more than a billion people have joined this important cause. We oppose any projects that attempt to assert a global right to taxpayer‑funded abortion on demand, up to the moment of delivery. And we will never tire of defending innocent life — at home or abroad.”

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Offline Mornac

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Re: Making America great again
« Reply #481 on: January 24, 2020, 05:01:45 PM »

Offline Mornac

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Re: Making America great again
« Reply #482 on: January 28, 2020, 06:10:51 PM »
TRUMP TOUTS HAVING APPOINTED 191 FEDERAL JUDGES

President: 'The justices that I'm going to appoint will be pro-life'

 
Bradley Eli, M.Div., Ma.Th.
January 28, 2020

WASHINGTON - The Senate has now confirmed 191 federal judges nominated by President Donald Trump.

Trump tweeted on Sunday, "191 Federal Judges (a record), and two Supreme Court Justices, approved."

Fox News was reporting on Thursday the Senate had already "confirmed 192 Trump-appointed federal judges. At the current rate of approval, it expects Trump will fill the remaining 79 current vacancies plus new vacancies arising prior to the end of his term in 2020.

According to the Heritage Foundation, Trump has placed 50 judges on the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. It's here where Trump is having the greatest effect in reshaping the federal judiciary.

The 179 judges seated on the 13 U.S. Circuit Courts rule on some 35,000 cases per year. Fewer than 100 cases pass on to the U.S. Supreme Court annually. Carrie Severino, chief counsel and policy director at the Judicial Crisis Network, emphasized the impact such judges have on this nation's rule of law.

"The Supreme Court takes very few cases. There's not an opportunity to correct every error made, and when you have activist judges at the lower levels of the federal judiciary, that can have a damaging effect on [the] American system and rule of law," remarked Severino.

Trump inherited a federal judiciary stacked with left-leaning appointments from former two-term president Barrack Obama. But Trump has already flipped the 2nd, 3rd and 11th Circuit Courts by replacing Democrat appointees with judges recommended by the conservative Federalist Society — an organization that fosters an originalist interpretation of the Constitution at various law schools across the country, as well as through forums and sponsored debates.

The Federalist Society is coming under increasing scrutiny by its leftist critics. The ethical advisory arm of the federal judiciary is reportedly circulating a draft rule that would ban judges and clerks from belonging to the organization.

The late Supreme Court Justice Anthony Scalia is held up as the icon of the originalist approach. Scalia stood in opposition to so-called judicial activists who claim the Constitution is a living document that adapts to the times.

"The Constitution that I interpret and apply is not living but dead, or as I prefer to call it, enduring," clarified Scalia. "It means today not what current society, much less the Court, thinks it ought to mean, but what it meant when it was adopted."

Trump now has his eye on flipping the notorious 9th Circuit Court, which has garnered a reputation for left-wing, activist rulings. The court — called the "Nutty Ninth" by its critics for its activist decisions — ruled in favor of Trump's "family planning" rule that redirected some $60 million in Title X funding away from abortion centers like Planned Parenthood and sent it to pro-life pregnancy centers instead.

One person who understands the effect Trump's judges will have on the country is Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. In 2016, she lamented, "I can't imagine what the country would be with Donald Trump as our president. For the country, it could be four years. For the Court, it could be — I don't even want to contemplate that."

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Offline hurricanehook

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Re: Making America great again
« Reply #483 on: January 28, 2020, 06:37:42 PM »
Trump is smarter than the average (Russian) bear.
“Everything is on its way to somewhere.”

Offline Mornac

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Re: Making America great again
« Reply #484 on: February 06, 2020, 05:01:47 PM »
New High of 90% of Americans Satisfied With Personal Life

FEBRUARY 6, 2020
JUSTIN MCCARTHY

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Nine in 10 Americans are satisfied with the way things are going in their personal life, a new high in Gallup's four-decade trend. The latest figure bests the previous high of 88% recorded in 2003.



These results are from Gallup's Mood of the Nation poll, conducted Jan. 2-15, which also recorded a 20-year high in Americans' confidence in the U.S. economy. The percentage of Americans who report being satisfied with their personal life is similar to the 86% who said in December that they were very or fairly happy -- though the happiness figure, while high, is on the low end of what Gallup has measured historically for that question.

Despite some variation, solid majorities of Americans have reported being satisfied with their personal life over the past few decades, with an average of 83% satisfied since 1979. The historical low of 73% was recorded in July 1979, as the effects of that year's oil crisis took a toll on U.S. motorists. During that poll's fielding dates, then-President Jimmy Carter delivered his "malaise speech," which was interpreted by some as placing blame on Americans themselves for the rough economic spot the country was in.

A 2019 survey on 10 aspects of Americans' lives found that they are most satisfied with their family life, their education and the way they spend their leisure time -- and least satisfied with the amount of leisure time they have, their household income and their job.

Two in Three 'Very' Satisfied With Direction of Personal Life
Gallup has asked a follow-up question since 2001 to measure the extent to which Americans are satisfied or dissatisfied with their personal life. The 65% of U.S. adults who are currently "very satisfied" marks a new high in the two-decade trend.

The more nuanced satisfaction ratings reveal that the relatively small four-percentage-point drop in personal satisfaction from 2007 to 2008 -- as the global economic crisis unfolded -- obscured greater movement (12 points) in the percentage "very" versus "somewhat" satisfied.



Income, Political Party, Marital Status the Biggest Factors in Satisfaction
Household income, political party affiliation and marital status are associated with the largest subgroup differences in Americans' satisfaction with their personal life.

Roughly 95% of Americans who live in high-income households, who identify as Republicans and who are married say they are satisfied with their personal life -- and about three in four among each of these groups are very satisfied.

Meanwhile, adults in low-income households are the least likely to say they are satisfied with their life, followed by Democrats and unmarried adults. Among each of these groups, small majorities report being very satisfied. Low-income Americans hold the distinction of having the lowest percentage very satisfied.

Smaller differences in personal satisfaction are seen by race and gender. Whites are a bit more likely than nonwhites to say they are satisfied (92% vs. 86%, respectively) or very satisfied (67% vs. 59%) with their personal life. And men report slightly higher levels of satisfaction than do women.

Bottom Line
It's likely no coincidence that Americans' heightened satisfaction with their personal life comes as confidence in the U.S. economy and their personal finances are also at long-term or record highs. That two in three Americans are very satisfied is reflective of this upbeat moment in time, and whether these sentiments carry through the coming decade will be something to watch.

The vast majority of Americans in all major demographic and political subgroups are content with the way their lives are going, but the additional question on how satisfied they are provides more insight. Some groups -- wealthier households, Republicans, married people -- report especially high levels of satisfaction, while lower-income Americans, Democrats and those who are unmarried report more tepid satisfaction.

https://news.gallup.com/poll/284285/new-high-americans-satisfied-personal-life.aspx

Offline hurricanehook

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Re: Making America great again
« Reply #485 on: February 07, 2020, 06:43:27 PM »
New High of 90% of Americans Satisfied With Personal Life

FEBRUARY 6, 2020
JUSTIN MCCARTHY

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Nine in 10 Americans are satisfied with the way things are going in their personal life, a new high in Gallup's four-decade trend. The latest figure bests the previous high of 88% recorded in 2003.



These results are from Gallup's Mood of the Nation poll, conducted Jan. 2-15, which also recorded a 20-year high in Americans' confidence in the U.S. economy. The percentage of Americans who report being satisfied with their personal life is similar to the 86% who said in December that they were very or fairly happy -- though the happiness figure, while high, is on the low end of what Gallup has measured historically for that question.

Despite some variation, solid majorities of Americans have reported being satisfied with their personal life over the past few decades, with an average of 83% satisfied since 1979. The historical low of 73% was recorded in July 1979, as the effects of that year's oil crisis took a toll on U.S. motorists. During that poll's fielding dates, then-President Jimmy Carter delivered his "malaise speech," which was interpreted by some as placing blame on Americans themselves for the rough economic spot the country was in.

A 2019 survey on 10 aspects of Americans' lives found that they are most satisfied with their family life, their education and the way they spend their leisure time -- and least satisfied with the amount of leisure time they have, their household income and their job.

Two in Three 'Very' Satisfied With Direction of Personal Life
Gallup has asked a follow-up question since 2001 to measure the extent to which Americans are satisfied or dissatisfied with their personal life. The 65% of U.S. adults who are currently "very satisfied" marks a new high in the two-decade trend.

The more nuanced satisfaction ratings reveal that the relatively small four-percentage-point drop in personal satisfaction from 2007 to 2008 -- as the global economic crisis unfolded -- obscured greater movement (12 points) in the percentage "very" versus "somewhat" satisfied.



Income, Political Party, Marital Status the Biggest Factors in Satisfaction
Household income, political party affiliation and marital status are associated with the largest subgroup differences in Americans' satisfaction with their personal life.

Roughly 95% of Americans who live in high-income households, who identify as Republicans and who are married say they are satisfied with their personal life -- and about three in four among each of these groups are very satisfied.

Meanwhile, adults in low-income households are the least likely to say they are satisfied with their life, followed by Democrats and unmarried adults. Among each of these groups, small majorities report being very satisfied. Low-income Americans hold the distinction of having the lowest percentage very satisfied.

Smaller differences in personal satisfaction are seen by race and gender. Whites are a bit more likely than nonwhites to say they are satisfied (92% vs. 86%, respectively) or very satisfied (67% vs. 59%) with their personal life. And men report slightly higher levels of satisfaction than do women.

Bottom Line
It's likely no coincidence that Americans' heightened satisfaction with their personal life comes as confidence in the U.S. economy and their personal finances are also at long-term or record highs. That two in three Americans are very satisfied is reflective of this upbeat moment in time, and whether these sentiments carry through the coming decade will be something to watch.

The vast majority of Americans in all major demographic and political subgroups are content with the way their lives are going, but the additional question on how satisfied they are provides more insight. Some groups -- wealthier households, Republicans, married people -- report especially high levels of satisfaction, while lower-income Americans, Democrats and those who are unmarried report more tepid satisfaction.

https://news.gallup.com/poll/284285/new-high-americans-satisfied-personal-life.aspx

I am loving life in the USA.............
“Everything is on its way to somewhere.”